Their Glass is Hot...
One furnace keeps over 70 kg (150 lbs) of clear glass at 1100°C (2000°F), 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, furnishing the molten glass that is the foundation for all their beautiful work.

Glory Holes...
Three other furnaces called “glory holes” are turned on to 1200°C (2200°F) whenever they are needed to heat and shape work in progress. The glory holes are also used to melt the bits of specially coloured glass that are added to the clear glass to give each piece its distinctive pattern.

Freeblown Glass...
Most of the work produced at New-Small and Sterling Studio Glass, Ltd. is “freeblown.” Freeblown or “off hand” glass is formed on the blowpipe and pontil (a solid rod) by the gaffer (master blower) using only heat, air, gravity and a few simple tools. Since molds are not used to give a piece its final form, freeblowing is more time consuming than traditional factory methods. The important advantage of this technique for David and the other artists is that they are able to use the full range of their skills and creativity to make each piece unique.

The Studio Glass Movement...
New-Small and Sterling Glass, Ltd. creates glass objects in the modern tradition of "studio glass" in which each piece is designed and executed by individual or a small team of craftspeople, always including the designer/artist. The Studio Glass Movement dates from the summer of 1962 when Harvey Littleton and a group of students built a small glass melting furnace in Toledo, Ohio and began experimenting with the hot, fluid material. That first furnace and workshop created such enthusiasm that hot glass has become part of the curriculum of more than 100 colleges and universities in North America. The resulting proliferation of forms and objects renewed our perception of glass as an exciting medium for artists and collectors.